Quote
"One cardinal rule is to be obscure – consciously, conscientiously, and constantly obscure. The number of people who can distinguish between obscurity and profundity is startlingly, and for your purposes fortunately, small. You should develop a jargon of your own; either make up words yourself or use ordinary words in entirely new and unclear meanings."

Francis J. Kerins, in a  brilliant 1961 essay on how to fake your way to success in academia: “The Academic Con-Men: Advice to Young College Professors,”  Journal of Higher Education (Available on Jstor)

(Source: literary-ethnography)

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amnhnyc:

Laura Watson Benedict (1861–1932) was the first anthropologist to travel to the Philippines in 1906 to study the Bagobo people. In 1910, the Museum purchased Benedict’s collection of 2,534 Bagobo artifacts for $4,000 and she was hired to accession it.
Four years later, Benedict became the first woman to earn a doctorate in anthropology from Columbia University, publishing her thesis, Bagobo Ceremonial Magic and Myth, in 1916. According to anthropologist Jay H. Bernstein in a 1985 article on Benedict, her study of the Bagobo “remains a forgotten treasure of 20th-century anthropology.”
Learn more about this pioneering anthropologist. 

amnhnyc:

Laura Watson Benedict (1861–1932) was the first anthropologist to travel to the Philippines in 1906 to study the Bagobo people. In 1910, the Museum purchased Benedict’s collection of 2,534 Bagobo artifacts for $4,000 and she was hired to accession it.

Four years later, Benedict became the first woman to earn a doctorate in anthropology from Columbia University, publishing her thesis, Bagobo Ceremonial Magic and Myth, in 1916. According to anthropologist Jay H. Bernstein in a 1985 article on Benedict, her study of the Bagobo “remains a forgotten treasure of 20th-century anthropology.”

Learn more about this pioneering anthropologist

Photoset

archiemcphee:

French photographer Thomas Rousset and graphic designer Raphael Verona spent three months in South American traveling around the Bolivian Plateau documenting the fascinating lives of a population of some 2 million indigenous people who practice “a peculiar blend of Roman Catholicism (a remnant of Spanish colonization), and Aymara mythology, which includes the worship of Pachamama (“Mother Earth”).”

Rousset and Verona made these magical people and their awesomely ornate costumes the subject of their new book Waska Tatay, “part ethnography, part picture-book fairy tale.” The book explores how the vibrant, mystical lives of these shamans, witches and spiritual healers both blend and collide with the mundane modern world.

"We were struck by how myths come to life when they are shared in the collective unconscious This is mainly why we wanted to show. The mix of images seemingly spontaneous, yet also built with other much staging reflect our desire to create an ambiguous language, the border of reality and fantasy, like our perception Bolivia."

Head over to iGNANT for additional images. Waska Tatay is available for purchase via IDPURE.

[via Wired and iGNANT]

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aeonmagazine:

Linklater: On Cinema and Time – an 8 min visual essay on Aeon Film

More than perhaps any other filmmaker, Richard Linklater has dedicated his career to exploring the relationship between time and film, and the impact of time on relationships, personalities, styles and cultures. His films explore the way time affects intimate moments and broad cultural phenomena. His latest work, Boyhood (2014), goes to extremes in its exploration of the temporal in cinema: shot over the course of 11 years with the same cast, the film literally traces the growth, development and ageing process of its characters.

Linklater: On Cinema and Time is a moving visual essay, connecting temporally distinct moments in film history, and illustrating their continuities and differences. It looks at the ways in which film has changed, stayed the same, or elaborated upon its own stories over the course of the past century. The film is an exploration of the cinema of time and the history of cinema, matching an insightful interview with Linklater to illustrative moments in his own and other, classic films.

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incidentalcomics:

Making the Leap

incidentalcomics:

Making the Leap

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Flora

Flora

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#vscocam #fieldwork

#vscocam #fieldwork

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Picture of a picture of a seaman’s first purchase #vscocam #fieldwork #ethnography

Picture of a picture of a seaman’s first purchase #vscocam #fieldwork #ethnography

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While I was hearing stories about landlords and their bastard children, this creature pranced about in the yard. #fieldwork #vscocam

While I was hearing stories about landlords and their bastard children, this creature pranced about in the yard. #fieldwork #vscocam

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Colours of my archive #vscocam #fieldnotes #fountainpen

Colours of my archive #vscocam #fieldnotes #fountainpen